MIST

Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Solar-Terrestrial

Latest news

Autumn MIST 2022

Registration and abstract submission for Autumn MIST 2022 are now open. This year Autumn MIST will be held on 18th November 2022, at the Geological Society in London.

 

Registration is £10 for online attendance, £20 for student in person attendance and £30 for staff in person attendance. The registration fee is non-refundable. Registration will close on 11/11/22. The link for registration is below:

https://www.store.reading.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/faculty-of-science/department-of-meteorology/autumn-mist

 

Talks will be given in a hybrid format and posters will be presented in person only. Abstract submission will close on 14/10/22. The link for abstract submission is below:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeqxVDIbd-fcmHnlKWVjom3GsAFk1IW6w8hnyUQOYE5SIPjdA/viewform?usp=sf_link

 

If you have any queries, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

New MIST Council 2021-

There have been some recent ingoings and outgoings at MIST Council - please see below our current composition!:

  • Oliver Allanson, Exeter (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2024 -- Chair
  • Beatriz Sánchez-Cano, Leicester (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2024
  • Mathew Owens, Reading (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2023
  • Jasmine Sandhu, Northumbria (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2023 -- Vice-Chair
  • Maria-Theresia Walach, Lancaster (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2022
  • Sarah Badman, Lancaster (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), to 2022
    (co-opted in 2021 in lieu of outgoing councillor Greg Hunt)

Charter amendment and MIST Council elections open

Nominations for MIST Council open today and run through to 8 August 2021! Please feel free to put yourself forward for election – the voting will open shortly after the deadline and run through to the end of August. The positions available are:

  • 2 members of MIST Council
  • 1 student representative (pending the amendment below passing)

Please email nominations to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 8 August 2021. Thank you!

Charter amendment

We also move to amend the following articles of the MIST Charter as demonstrated below. Bold type indicates additions and struck text indicates deletions. Please respond to the email on the MIST mailing list before 8 August 2021 if you would like to object to the amendment; MIST Charter provides that it will pass if less than 10% of the mailing list opposes its passing. 

4.1  MIST council is the collective term for the officers of MIST and consists of six individuals and one student representative from the MIST community.

5.1 Members of MIST council serve terms of three years, except for the student representative who serves a term of one year.

5.2 Elections will be announced at the Spring MIST meeting and voting must begin within two months of the Spring MIST meeting. Two slots on MIST council will be open in a given normal election year, alongside the student representative.

5.10 Candidates for student representative must not have submitted their PhD thesis at the time that nominations close.

SSAP roadmap update

The STFC Solar System Advisory Panel (SSAP) is undertaking a review of the "Roadmap for Solar System Research", to be presented to STFC Science Board later this year. This is expected to be a substantial update of the Roadmap, as the last full review was carried out in 2012, with a light-touch update in 2015.

The current version of the SSAP Roadmap can be found here.

In carrying out this review, we will take into account changes in the international landscape, and advances in instrumentation, technology, theory, and modelling work. 

As such, we solicit your input and comments on the existing roadmap and any material we should consider in this revision. This consultation will close on Wednesday 14 July 2021 and SSAP will try to give a preliminary assessment of findings at NAM.

This consultation is seeking the view of all members of our community and we particularly encourage early career researchers to respond. Specifically, we invite:

Comments and input on the current "Roadmap for Solar System Research" via the survey by clicking here.

Short "white papers" on science investigations (including space missions, ground-based experimental facilities, or computing infrastructure) and impact and knowledge exchange (e.g. societal and community impact, technology development). Please use the pro-forma sent to the MIST mailing list and send your response to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Quo vadis interim board

 

A white paper called "Quo vadis, European space weather community" has been published in J. Space Weather Space Clim. which outlines plans for the creation of an organisation to represent the European space weather community.
Since it was published, an online event of the same name was organised on 17 March 2021. A “Quo Vadis Interim Board” was then set up, to establish a mechanism for this discussion, which will go on until June 21st.

The Interim Board is composed of volunteers from the community in Europe. Its role is to coordinate the efforts so that the space weather (and including space climate) European community can:

  1. Organise itself
  2. Elect people to represent them

To reach this goal, the Interim Board is inviting anyone interested in and outside Europe to join the “Quo Vadis European Space Weather Community ” discussion forum.

Eligible European Space Weather Community members should register to the “Electoral Census” to be able to vote in June for the final choice of organisation.

This effort will be achieved through different actions indicated on the Quo Vadis webpage and special Slack workspace.

Spring MIST details released

The next Spring MIST meeting has been announced by the conference chair, Rob Fear. The cconference will be held 26–28 March 2018, on the University of Southampton's Highfield Campus.

There is just over a week left to submit your abstracts for the meeting – the abstract deadline, for both talk and poster presentations, is Sunday 11 February 2018.

In order to submit an abstract it is necessary to register first – please include your conference booking number in your abstract email. Conference registration will remain open until Friday 2nd March, and options are available both including and excluding accommodation, as well as for people who would just like to attend for one day. All bookings for the entire conference include the conference dinner.

RAS Meeting: Ground effects of severe space weather events

This RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting is to be held at Burlington House on 9 March, organised by Ciaran Beggan (BGS); Jim Wild (Lancaster); and Mark Gibbs (Met Office). If you'd like more details, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The abstract is as follows!

As a society, the UK is reliant on continuously available electricity supplies and technology such as instantaneous satellite data and communications in order to function safely and efficiently. For example, systems such as transportation networks are increasingly automated and the computer networks which run them require accurate real-time information from embedded electronic sensors and other peripheral data such as timing derived from GPS. However, this dependence increases the exposure to impacts on technology from so-called severe space weather events. Space weather is usually defined as the response of Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere to sudden rapid changes in the properties of the solar wind such as increases in speed, density and magnetic field strength.

These changes in the magnetosphere and ionosphere cause the magnetic field at the Earth's surface to vary rapidly giving rise to geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) which can flow through conductive grounded equipment, such as high-voltage transformers, affecting the reliability of electricity supplies. The additional energy input from the solar wind also changes the conductivity structure of the ionosphere and pushes the auroral oval equatorward. This affects the propagation of radio waves through the atmosphere delaying GPS signals and leading to spatial and temporal errors on the ground; HF communications to circumpolar aircraft may also be disrupted. As well as the impact on electricity grids, GICs also cause additional unwanted corrosion in pipelines and the potential for signalling or other faults to develop in rail networks.

We seek presentations on a broad topic of ground effect of space weather in the UK (but specifically excluding satellite or spacecraft effects), in particular to GIC in power networks, railways and pipelines and topics such as impacts on surveyors and others end users (e.g. airlines/port authorities) of precise GPS location and timing data.

This specialist discussion meeting, aimed at academic and industry researchers and relevant end users, will discuss the latest research in the UK on understanding and ameliorating these impacts in light of recent developments in the field.

RAS Meeting: Dynamic coupling in the terrestrial atmosphere

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting is to be held at Burlington House on Friday 8 December. The meeting is being convened in conjunction with the Royal Meteorological Society, and is convened by Tracy Moffat-Griffin and Andrew Kavanagh (BAS); Nick Mitchell (Bath); and Alan Gadian (Leeds). If you'd like more details, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you'd like to attend, please register on the Eventbrite page for the meeting so that the convenors can tailor the meeting space to the number of attendees.

The abstract is below!

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the lower, middle and upper atmosphere are more strongly coupled than was once thought to be the case and that atmospheric waves play a central role in this coupling. Generated by a variety of sources, these waves carry energy and momentum vertically, and are a principle driver of atmospheric circulation, transporting important chemical species through the atmosphere. In the lower atmosphere global scale waves (tides and planetary waves) are generated; smaller scale waves (such as gravity waves) are generated by weather systems, topographic flow and the polar vortex as well as by processes in the upper atmosphere (via space weather effects). There is growing evidence that space weather can have an effect on surface conditions in the Polar Regions yet the coupling mechanism is not fully understood. This meeting aims to bring together the lower, middle and upper atmosphere communities to explore these coupling effects and their impact on global circulation.